Cat In The Hat Hats

One thing that will get you out of a blogging slump is a phone call from your sister-in-law! She called me for advice on making Cat In The Hat cookies, and it just so happened I had advice on making Cat In The Hat cookies ALREADY sitting on my computer! Photos edited and ready to go! Like….. from months ago!

Here’s my advice. Pull out your Fourth of July cookie cutters. If you want a Cat Hat that is the PERFECT size for a platter of cookies, use your flag cutter trust me. Cut out a flag, then use the round part of the flag pole to trim the long part of the flag pole. Like this:

Dr Suess Cat Hat (Ellie's Bites)Next it’s easy to use red and white (both one step- or 20 second consistency) icing and make wide horizontal stripes up the height of the “hat”, make sure to start with white on the bottom “brim”. Let these red and white stripes dry for several hours, or overnight. When they are completely dry, use a black food color marker to sketch in the details in a Seuss-like manner.

Dr Seuss Platter (Ellie's Bites)

 

Wendi (my sister-in-law) only asked for the hats, but if you’re wondering, the green ham is a mini pear cutter, and the fish are painstakingly hand drawn. Also, Thing A and B, in this case refer to the birthday boy’s big brothers. It wasn’t a mistake :)

 

 

Little Birthday Cakes

We forget, as we grow up, how difficult it really is to be a child. First, there is the whole “lack of speech, can only cry when I need something” thing. And even as words are added to their vocabulary, sometimes they still can’t express exactly what it is that they want. And even more frustrating, when they are older, and they have words to express almost everything that they want to communicate, we grownups don’t always take everything they say seriously. They have such tremendous imaginations. If there was a way to channel the ideas coming from the mind of an almost six year old, and make those ideas a reality, how fantastic could this world be?

And sometimes, their ideas are just born out of necessity. For example:

“Mommy, can I get this?”

“Not today.”

“But it’s Rebecca’s birthday and I want to get it for her.”

First of all, Rebecca is Ellie’s American Girl Doll. Second of all, this is the first I am hearing of her birthday.

“Ellie, you don’t have any money to buy that today.”

“But mom! She’s FAMILY! She is my DAUGHTER!”

OK. We agreed we were not going to buy the present, however, we decided that I would bake her a cake and we would have a little party.

If you think I go overboard, would you believe my husband bought the doll a present?